Libby Caes’ Homily for May 7, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 0 Comments

Libby Caes May 7, 2017 John 10:1-10, Acts 2:42-47 This is our second year of Wisdom Reads. Each year a Benedictine value is identified and then a book appropriate for all ages is selected that reflects this value. . This year’s read is Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman. This year’s Benedictine value is community. If you haven’t read Seedfolks  there are copies the lobby reception area. You can also get it out of your local library.   If you’ve ever lived in a large urban area or in a low income neighborhood, you know about vacant lots. Vacant lots are a …

Patty Jenkins’ Homily for April 30, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 1 Comment

A friend of mine noted that this passage from Luke is a story about stories. The women tell a story to the men, which is deemed an idle tale, but compelling enough for a couple of the men to go check it out for themselves. Apparently Simon Peter has told a story to the eleven about Jesus appearing to him, a story we are not told. Cleopas and his companion tell their story to Jesus, who is playing the trickster by hiding himself from them. Jesus tells stories from Moses and the prophets to the two on the road. The …

Joseph Wiesenfarth’s Homily, April 23, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 0 Comments

Joseph Wiesenfarth First Sunday after Easter 23 April 2017 Acts 2:14a, 22-32; 1 Peter 1:3-9; John 20:19-31   This first Sunday after Easter has long been known as Low Sunday because in contrast to Easter Sunday it cannot possibly be as festive.  It is also less well known by the strange name of Quasimodo Sunday from the former introductory prayer of the Mass (Quasi modo geniti infants—that is, As you are newborn children), which referred to those newly baptized as well as to the Resurrection itself.  And although the apostle Thomas doesn’t quite fit into that class of person, his …

Paul Knitter’s Homily for Easter, April 16, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 0 Comments

JESUS CONTINUES TO DO HIS THING (Acts. 10:34-43; 1Cor 5:6b-8; John 20:1-18)   This may not be the most appropriate way to begin an Easter sermon, but I have to be honest with myself and you: Scholars of the New Testament can’t really agree about just what happened on the first Easter morning.  They wrestle with two central questions, both of which, as we’ll see, are grounded in our first and third readings. Which came first, scholars ask:  1) The physical appearances of Jesus that enabled his followers to have faith in him, or 2) The enduring faith his followers …

David McKee’s Homily from Easter Vigil, April 15, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 0 Comments

Easter Vigil 15 April 2017     Good evening everyone…and let me just say, ALLELUIA!   Don’t you just love this night?…the beauty and the elemental mystery of it all.  I think it calls for another shout-out of the A-word, which we buried on Ash Wednesday and have resurrected tonight: 1-2-3…ALLELUIA!   OK, good.  So much for “liturgy as pep rally.”  Now we have to get down to the hard stuff…and it really is hard stuff. Tonight, in our Easter celebration, if we choose to take it seriously, by taking it into our own hearts, we are brought face-to-face with …

figure kneeling in prayer with Holy Spirit hovering above

The power of God’s sustaining presence

Lynne Smith, OSB Building Community, Homilies, Living in Community 0 Comments

We enter into Holy Week with millions of people suffering in Syria, in South Sudan, Somalia, Yemen and so many other places in our world. As I reflected on Jesus’ suffering on the cross, I wondered what help and hope the crucifixion and resurrection gives us. I find that hope and help in the silent presence of God even in the midst of suffering. Often it is only in looking back that we can see that Presence in times of suffering. Occasionally we experience this sustaining Presence in the moment.   _______________________________  Palm Sunday/Passion Sunday homily                                         Lynne Smith, OSB …

Colleen Hartung’s Homily from April 2, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 0 Comments

John 11: 1-44 Homily by Colleen Hartung April 2, 2017   To be honest, the story of Martha, Mary and the death and resurrection of Lazarus is not one of my favorites.  I find myself aligned with the crowd and their question, “Could not he who opened the eyes of the blind man have kept this man from dying?”  And I just can’t quite wrap my mind and my heart around the idea that this family should suffer so that others might see and for the sake of glorifying God.  But, lucky for me since I had this homily to …

Patti La Cross’ Homily, March 26, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 1 Comment

First I would like thank Lynn for replacing the scheduled reading of Samuel’s call this morning with the female prophet Huldah. I appreciate hearing of another hidden figure in the history of our faith.   Today’s Gospel story is set in a culture ruled by the sin police Jesus chose to enlighten both the blind man and all who would listen not on the origins of disability, but on the life available to those who join in his new creation. Jesus meets this man as he is, accepting him into the full mercy of God, and the community of disciples. …

Mary Gordon’s Homily, March 19, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 1 Comment

Sermon: Woman at the Well I am always relieved when I look at the Gospel for the day I must give a sermon and find it’s one of the ones when Jesus is Lovable. He isn’t always. I don’t know what I’d do if I had to speak on the parts of the Gospel that make me want to turn away from him: when he curses the fig tree, tells the man not to bury his father, says divorce is out of the question. But today I was lucky, because I get to speak about one of my favorite Gospel …

Libby Caes’ Homily from Ash Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Holy Wisdom Monastery Homilies 0 Comments

Ash Wednesday, March 1 Matthew 6:1-6, 16-21   We are all social creatures. Because we are social creatures, we care what other people think of us. Two autobiographies that Dave and I recently listened to illustrate this well. The first is from An Invisible Thread:  by Laurie Schroff. The author grew up in an Italian family on Long Island. Every night Laurie and her siblings would hold their breath wondering if Dad would come home calm or fighting his demons. If he was drunk her father would abuse her mother and brother. He would break furniture and throw whatever he …